Everything Uganda: Trees of Masaka Part 3

Everything Uganda: Trees of Masaka Part 3

. By Eric Barigye Welcome back to our weekly blog that focuses on a particular aspect to learn more about the people and place that play host to our Adventure Like No Other! This week, we conclude the Trees of Masaka series! . If you missed the previous entries, you can find them here: Part 1 and Part 2. This week we are going with an all edible fruit tree line up. Luckily, you’ll find them all in season on your arrival to Uganda! . . .   ... Jackfruit Tree Starting with the Artocarpus heterophyllus better known as Fene in Luganda and Jackfruit in English. Something that will surprise even Ugandans is that this tree actually originates from Asia, probably in the forests of the Western Ghats in India and is said to have been introduced to Uganda as late as the 1940s! It’s a medium-sized tree with thick branches, to 25 meters, and it produces a white gummy liquid when injured. Of course, the most popular use is the big sweet fruit it produces (hence the name) but the latex from the trunk and branches have resins that are valuable in varnishes as well. The latex is commonly used as adhesive for mending broken chinaware or earthenware, caulking boats, mending holes of buckets and trapping birds. It can serve as a substitute for rubber. . . . Avocado Tree Next, we have Persea Americana which is Avocado in English.  In Uganda, it’s grown in all moist areas. It has a densely leafy evergreen medium and grows to 9-20 meters in height. Besides providing the fruit we all know...

The Uganda Marathon COVID-19 Response

Dear Friends. It is with great sadness that we have announced that, due to the current COVID-19 pandemic,  we are forced to postpone the 2020 Uganda Marathon week-long Adventure, and the Uganda Marathon Race, until Summer 2021. Prior to the 18th March, our stance was that the event was due to continue as planned, as long as it was safe, participants were able to get to Uganda, and that we had not received instructions to cancel from local or national authorities. However since then, tight controls have been put into place in Uganda that make the safe organisation of this event impossible. These controls include: Changes in the FCO travel advice to advise against all but essential travel to Uganda – https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/uganda. Updates from the Ugandan government Ministry of Health advising against foreign travel to Uganda. The closure of the only international airport in Uganda for all non-essential travel. The closure of roads into the country for all non-essential travel. Strict quarantine instructions for all Ugandan residents returning home that force them to isolate for 14 days on arrival. The banning of all big gatherings The banning of all press conferences. The closure of all schools, universities and churches. It is difficult to predict how long these measures will be enforced for, but after conversations with the local authorities and our sponsors, we realised that we can no longer hold the event this May and so we have no choice but to postpone the 2020 event. We are devastated as a team, but even in this time of sadness, we are touched by the messages of understanding and support...
Everything Uganda: From Your Projects – A Day in the Life of a Farmer

Everything Uganda: From Your Projects – A Day in the Life of a Farmer

. By Eric Barigye Welcome back to our weekly blog that explores a particular aspect of Uganda life, to learn more about the people, place and Charity Projects which host our Adventure Like No Other. This week we return to the projects and beneficiaries being supported by the 2021 event! . Masaka Youth Development Association was started in 2013 for and by the youth community of Ssaza to combat the poverty and unemployment in the area. They are now looking to expand to nearby areas with the help of members like Solomon Kigoye.  Having joined after learning of MAYDAS through a friend in 2014, Solomon has risen to the committee position of treasurer. From a family of farmers, he joined shortly after his A-Levels when he went full time into farming and luckily MAYDAS was there to give him the capital he needed to grow his scale.  . . Solomon’s Day Solomon wakes at 6:00 AM and after early morning preparations, he leaves his house for the shamba. March is the beginning of the wet season here in Uganda and this is the time farmers plant their seeds as can be gleaned here.  Solomon himself is planting maize and beans on the 1.5-acre land his family owns.  He tilled it recently and so the holes he has to put the seeds are prepared. He practices intercropping of beans and maize by putting 3 of each type in the same hole before covering it with soil. He does this because of the small size of the plantation as well as the cost he saves when fertilizing. He tells me the...
Everything Uganda: Trees of Masaka Part 2

Everything Uganda: Trees of Masaka Part 2

. By Eric Barigye Welcome back to our weekly blog that focuses on a particular aspect to learn more about the place, people and this week – continuing with the trees that colour our Adventure Like No Other! . If you did not catch the first entry of this series please find it here. . . .   ... Budongo Mahogany We begin with Entandrophragma Angolense or Mukusu in Luganda and Budongo Mahogany in English. This tree is indigenous to Uganda growing along forest edges and in thickets. It is a very large deciduous tree to 50 m with a deep crown and dense foliage. Providing good shed it is also used as an ornamental tree. The wood is highly valued for exterior and interior joinery, furniture, cabinetwork, veneer and plywood, and is also used for flooring, interior trim, panelling, stairs, shipbuilding and coffins. The seeds have a fat content of about 60% which makes them rich in cis-vaccenic acid, an oleic acid isomer that can be used in the industrial production of nylon-11. Sadly this tree has been overharvested in Uganda and is now nearly extinct. . . . . . East African Satin Wood Next, we see Zanthoxylum Gilletii (Fagara Macrophylla) or Munyenye in Luganda and East African Satin Wood in English. In Uganda, it grows in tropical rain forests, especially in lower- and medium-altitude forests. Growing between 10 and 35m this trees’ timber is heavy, yellow-white, sweet-scented, tough and easily worked. The trade name “satinwood” comes from the bright shiny appearance of the polished timber. The bark is used to treat cough. The seed coat contains an...
2021 event open for registration. Our team are currently providing Covid-19 emergency reliefSee how here
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